Trying this tonight with masala dosa!

Salt and Pepper

radish-curry1.jpg

This curry follows the basic principles of making Kerala style mezhukkupuratti. The addition of garlic is not common, but we do add it while making plantain mezhukkupuratti.

Recipe:

Ingredients

A bunch of red radish – contains 6 to 8 radishes.

Onion- one small, sliced.

Garlic- 2 or 3 small cloves crushed

Green chilis – 8 small, crushed

Turmeric powder- a pinch.

Oil for saute

Mustard seeds – a pinch

Curry leaves- a sprig

Salt to taste

The leaves: Roll all the leaves together and slice into long shreds.

Method:

Clean the radishes and cut them as you would slice an apple. Clean the leaves, if you want to use them in the dish.

radish-curry2.jpg

In a pan, add some oil. When it is hot, add the mustard seeds.

When the mustard seeds splutter, add curry leaves and onions. Saute for 3-5 mins till edges of the onions turn slightly brown.

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Cashew Nut Fruit Apple

No Juicer Juice–Apple, Celery, Parsley–Stress Reliever Juice

The use of a blender, or Ninja is a great alternative to an expensive juicer. Here is how I do it:

1. put 1 cup of distilled, room temp water into Ninja

2. cut up your pink lady apple, 2 stalks of celery (use all of the celery-even the yellowish, leaves), ~1 tablespoon fresh ginger, a small bunch of parsley (you don’t have to cut the parsley)

3. add all ingredients to Ninja, and add a dash of cayenne pepper (fire element)

4. blend on setting 1, then 2. blend until you see the pulp that is being flicked onto the sides of the Ninja fall down to be blended again (see video)

5.have a glass ready with  a piece of cheesecloth covering the opening

6. pour the juice and pulp onto the cheesecloth and press the juice through using a rubber spatula

7. put remaining pulp into a plastic container to freeze for compost (or whatever you want to use it for)

8. clean up (I like the Ninja because it is easier to clean than a juicer, and all its parts)

9. enjoy your juice in the morning sun

10. recite your morning mantra:

I am…

joyful

loving

patient

peaceful

whole

a shining being

~~Queen Afua-Sacred Woman

sorry pics not in order…

 

Good Food


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Food on my Mind

You may be wondering why I have been posting so many food blog entries…

or not…

Well I’ll tell you anyway, 

I have been trying to find the right foods that are easy to digest for my sensitive stomach. I cut out red meat a long time ago, and dairy even longer ago. Now I am a vegetarian (since around December, 2011). I thought this would really help my digestion woes, but I still had bubbles in my stomach after eating certain meals. I kept on eating things without trying to pin point the culprits.

Enough is enough! 

I have decided to cut out soy and gluten (think I am gluten-sensitive).

Goodness! What can I eat???

Basically, fruits and veggies, and rice. 

I am also trying to find what foods trigger the inability to control high stress levels. I have lately been experiencing high anxiety, and riding an emotional roller coaster! I am almost certain is has a lot to do with sugar (all refined types)! So no more of that either, I have now cut back about 90%. It would have been 100% if I looked closer at my cereal ingredients, which read brown sugar. I have honey and agave nectar; I wonder if these are digested and metabolized the same as refined sugar??? I’ll go easy on these too. 

Anyway, there you go, now you know why my mind has been on food lately. This food trip also relates to my hair, big time! I’ll be making a hair video soon; I have seen some changes in my scalp that I must rant about! 

I hope you enjoy the food entries, more to come…

Are Strawberries in Season?

I don’t know, but I just bought 4 pounds for $5 at Sunflower Market!

Smoothie time!

4 large strawberries

a few slices of fresh pineapple

1 banana

a handful of whole flax seeds

a squirt of Holy Basil leaf liquid herb

3 ice cubes

about 3/4 cup rice milk

Burros and Yucca

I went fruit and veggie shopping today at Food City! (check out the link on 5 reasons to go to food city) I got some new things to try. Burros bananas and yucca root (cassava).

Burros bananas:

Burro Banana

Usage: Eat fresh, baked, or add to fruit salads or desserts.

When ripe, the skin of the burro banana is yellow with black spots. The flesh is creamy white or yellow and the fruit will be soft with some firmness toward the center when ripe.

Avoid: Avoid bananas with soft spots, black or moldy stems. Gray-yellow or dull yellow bananas are an indicator of improper temperature handling and will probably not develop full flavor.

Seasonal Information

Available year-round from Mexico.

Burro Banana Nutritional Information

Serving Size: 1 medium banana (126g)

Amount Per Serving

Calories 110

Calories from Fat 0

% Daily Value*

Total Fat 0

0% 

Cholesterol 0mg

0% 

Sodium 0mg

0% 

Total Carbohydrate 29g

10% 

Dietary Fiber 4g

16%

Potassium 400mg

10%

Sugars 21g

Protein 1g

Vitamin A 0%

Vitamin C 15%

Calcium 0%

Iron 0%

Vitamin B6 20%

*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.

Source: PMA’s Labeling Facts

Burro Banana is Low Fat and Sodium-free. It’s also a good source of fiber and potassium, and a great source of vitamin C & B6, Cholesterol-free.

CASSAVA

Cassava is a shrubby, tropical, perennial plant that is not well known in the temperate zone. For most people, cassava is most commonly associated with tapioca. The plant grows tall, sometimes reaching 15 feet, with leaves varying in shape and size. The edible parts are the tuberous rootand leaves. The tuber (root) is somewhat dark brown in color and grows up to 2 feet long.

Cassava thrives better in poor soils than any other major food plant. As a result, fertilization is rarely necessary. However, yields can be increased by planting cuttings on well drained soil with adequate organic matter. Cassava is a heat-loving plant that requires a minimum temperature of 80 degrees F to grow. Since many cultivars are drought resistant, cassava can survive even during the dry season when the soil moisture is low, but humidity is high.

Around the world, cassava is a vital staple for about 500 million people. Cassava’s starchy roots produce more food energy per unit of land than any other staple crop. Its leaves, commonly eaten as a vegetable in parts of Asia and Africa, provide vitamins and protein. Nutritionally, the cassava is comparable to potatoes, except that it has twice the fiber content and a higher level of potassium.

The cassava used in Indies International Cassava Chips is known by the Latin name Manihot Utilisima. It is grown in the farm lands surrounding the town of Bogor in West Java, Indonesia, about 37 miles south of Jakarta, Indonesia’s capital city.

In Indonesia, cassava is used in a variety of food products, the same way potatoes are used in the U.S. They can be used as vegetables in dishes, grated to make pancakes, dried and ground into tapioca flour, or sliced and made into snack chips.

I’ll be trying the sncak chips!

100 Best Health Foods #5: Apricots

APRICOTS

For the sweet-toothers like me!

High in

  • vitamin C

  • folate

  • potassium

  • vitamin E

  • beta carotene

Try adding dried apricots to a home-made trail mix for a boost of energy, and sweet flavor!

Interesting fact:
Cooking fresh apricots will increase the carotene and soluble fiber absorption into the body!

Apricot Breakfast Muffins Recipe (Substitute whole wheat flour, apple sauce, agave nectar, or soy milk for a healthier twist!)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped dried apricots
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange peel

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk and oil; mix well. Stir into dry ingredients just until combined. Fold in apricots and orange peel. Fill paper-lined muffin cups two-thirds full.
  2. Bake at 400 degrees F for 15-20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack. Serve warm.