Rastafarian women

Wow! I did nit know this about Rastafarian religion, but I guess I should have known! The list starts out nice, but quickly declines in attractiveness!

Women are known as Queens
The main role of women is to look after their King
Women are regarded as subordinate to men
Women are regarded as housekeepers and child bearers
Women must not commit infidelity
Women are not called to Rastafari except through their husbands
Women cannot be leaders
Men are the spiritual head of the family
Women must not cook for their husbands when menstruating
Women must not wear makeup, dress in promiscuous clothing, or use chemicals in their hair
Women must not use birth control, as it is regarded as a European tactic to suppress the development of the African population. This builds on the Old Testament prophecy that ‘The seeds of Israel shall be numberless’
Women must also abstain from abortion which is regarded as murder
Women must cover their hair to pray, in keeping with the Biblical teaching in 1 Corinthians 11:5: “And any woman who prays or proclaims God’s message in public worship with nothing on her head disgraces her husband…”

http://www.bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/rastafari/beliefs/women.shtml

The Beauty Within

Mature, upbeat, positive message for all women to take seriously! Being real, natural, and free is a beautiful thing!

 

100 Best Health Foods #5: Apricots

APRICOTS

For the sweet-toothers like me!

High in

  • vitamin C

  • folate

  • potassium

  • vitamin E

  • beta carotene

Try adding dried apricots to a home-made trail mix for a boost of energy, and sweet flavor!

Interesting fact:
Cooking fresh apricots will increase the carotene and soluble fiber absorption into the body!

Apricot Breakfast Muffins Recipe (Substitute whole wheat flour, apple sauce, agave nectar, or soy milk for a healthier twist!)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup chopped dried apricots
  • 2 teaspoons grated orange peel

Directions

  1. In a large bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. In another bowl, combine the eggs, milk and oil; mix well. Stir into dry ingredients just until combined. Fold in apricots and orange peel. Fill paper-lined muffin cups two-thirds full.
  2. Bake at 400 degrees F for 15-20 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool for 5 minutes before removing from pan to a wire rack. Serve warm.

Dees Dreds Din Gone Crazy!

In a few more months it will be one year since I started my locs. It has been a truly happy to be nappy experience, but let me tell you about these locs. I have gone through several stages. I tried to keep them manicured for a few weeks, by going to get them retwisted every 2-3 weeks, then I did DIY for a while, then I semi-free formed for a while, then they and I went crazy ,and I removed about 2/3 of the locs in the back and sides. I’ll explain each phase in detail and where I am now:

Stage 1: Retwisting Religiously (tongue twister for ya)

  • My hair dresser who I mentioned in an older post, agreed to give me a discount for retwisting if I would come in every 2- 3 weeks. That was the catch. I had to come in fairly often and spend $35 each time. Not bad if you are not living right at the poverty line on a grad school grant. That would have been almost like having an extra bill per month totaling up to $70. I can’t even do it!

Stage 2: DIY Ditty

  • I was used to fixing my own hair anyway, so I thought that I could wash and twist my new locs myself. This worked somewhat, but I think 2 things happened. (1) I may have twisted in the opposite direction than my hairdresser had started the locs, which is kind of a problem because although the locs would still loc, they would be weak at that point where they had to change direction. Also, the shorter locs didn’t know what to do. I’ll come back to that in stage 4. (2) I could not see what I was doing in the back of my head. My shorter hair would come totally a loose after washing, and I would struggle with getting the parts back straight in the back. So this leads into Stage 3:

Stage 3: Free-form Fail

  • Free-forming is letting your hair naturally loc by just washing and going; no combing, no parting, no twisting: (see Bob Marley, Lauryn Hill?) Semi-free-form is doing that for about 1-2 months, then going to get them retwisted (or DIY). A while ago, I noticed that my hair was thin on one side, and at the back (near the nape) of my head. So I thought I would let these areas alone for a while, and let them grow out how they want to. Let them thicken up with new growth, and without me trying to get them tight and right. By this time, my crown, was fully locked and happy. One day after washing my hair, my scalp in those same areas just did not feel right. I was worried that this area would never lock up…I wanted to be a free spirit, and live, look, and feel organic, I also felt that something was not right, especially when it looked like my hair had not grown much in over 6 months!

Stage 4: The break-down-take down

  • That same day, I decided to comb through the area that would not lock. I wanted to see how much of my hair was an afro and what I was really working with. I was astonished! It was more than half unlocked! AHHH! OK, OK Calm down. I just could not beleive it. It has been alost 9 months, and more than 1/2 my hair was an afro…BUT that was not my worry. I knew that I would have to wait up to a year AT LEAST to see my hair lock completely. The problem was that the other 1/3 was FULLY LOCKED! Like: shake-dem-dreads-locked! It was crazy. I thought I should shave my head and start over. Or shave it like this:

Such a Hot Look! It would have looked just like this, but shorter locs!

  • I almost did, for real! I contemplated what to do. I wanted to continue to free-form, but I did not want to have to tend to the 2/3 part different than the 1/3 part; and what if they looked vastly different over the next year? I was clueless. I went to get advice from the hair dresser, and she gave me the option of plaiting, and/or interlocking that 2/3. I went with plaits… tight plaits. This was about 2 weeks ago, and I just washed my hair Tuesday. I used a tight stocking cap, Dr. Bonner‘s solid soap, and rinsed really well. It WORKED! Everything stayed twisted and plaited. Finally! So the plaits don’t really need much maintenance. If they start to unravel, then I quickly plait them back, but other than that, I hope the new growth will come in ready to be twisted to RIGHT (I got it going now!)
From now on I will:
Be patient
Have courage
Go with the flow

 

Be happy to be nappy no matter what!

knit-tink-think

Knitting is an addiction! I am making cute summer head-wraps for locs (and for all hair styles). they will be soon featured on my ETSY page: KnititNappy

Check it out!

Love,Truth,Soul

These last few days, I have been doing a whole lotta Soul Searching! I have been reading, dancing, singing, writing poems, crying, listening to folk, African, classical and Caribbean music, finding websites that discuss the struggles of the black diaspora. And I feel great. I have also been crocheting, knitting, and volunteering at a craft circle for refugee families. I have learned so much about myself, my new environment, and my future! I am single for the first time in 12 years! My strength comes from within now for the first time in a long time! I have had time to breathe. I have had time to be alone. I have had time to think. I want to get this blog back up, and show a new side of me. I cannot promise I won’t go MIA again, but I am doing my best to shape and mold a multitude of broad interests into a core of blended goodness to share with you!

As Dolly Parton said: You "better get to livin'"!